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Complaints at Broadway building part of pushback over adding ‘smart lock’ and home automation tech to apartments

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(Image: CHS)

By Harley Rose

Complaints filed with the city against developers of a Broadway apartment building illustrate a growing tension for Capitol Hill renters, landlords, and tenants across Seattle over new “smart lock” and home automation technology.

Patent 523 tenants say in June Essex Property Trust  informed them by email that a SmartRent system was to be implemented at the Broadway apartment complex.

SmartRent is a home automation company that develops software and hardware for home owners, property managers and renters.. The application system acts as a control on smart home functions from a centralized application, including but not limited to heating, rent payment, and key code entry to a house or apartment. 

Tenants who want a year long lease renewal said they were informed that the code entry system would be necessary for the renewal. Notification of the installation of this application was posted in late October with a choice to opt out of the system by renewing on a shorter term lease.

The state requires a 48 hour notice before any landlord or property owners can enter an apartment in a non-emergency setting.

Two tenants who filed complaints and say they chose to opt out by signing a shorter term lease, tell CHS they had an event of entry without the required notification.

According to these tenants, on November 4, the installation day, “the SmartRent installers knocked on our door, waited a few seconds, then unlocked it and tried to enter. Thankfully my roommate was home and kicked them out.“ One renter describes the events as “definitely an unlawful entry since we received no notice and didn’t consent.”

CHS is not identifying the renters out of concerns over possible retaliation.

In September, The Stranger reported on the growth of the SmartRent industry in Seattle which can include smart locks, water sensors, touchscreen thermostats, smart plugs, and a wireless hubs. In addition to individual privacy and security concerns, the trend represents another challenge and expense for area tenants already dealing with high rents and limited housing choices.

One tenant CHS heard from said they are a security consultant and are frustrated with the process after not receiving a  response from management about their concerns, which lie mostly in the security of the building.

According to the tenants, they spoke with SmartRent to express that “no matter how good their product might be, we didn’t ask for it and it adds unnecessary complexity that puts our security and privacy at risk.”

Several complaints have been filed regarding this change, and according to a city representative, the complaints “haven’t been assigned or investigated yet.”

The official added that the “Prohibited Acts Ordinance echoes state law by requiring landlords to provide two days of notice before entering units to do necessary if agreed repairs. If they fail to do so, City of Seattle will start by educating the owners on the requirements and warning them. If violations persist, we could issue a Notice of Violation.” Since talking to the official, two of the statuses on the complaint page have been updated to “Under Investigation.”

Both Essex Property Trust and SmartRent declined to comment when asked about the issues.


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jarmartinezs
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The Hater’s Guide to Mayor Pete

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Pete Buttigieg has campaigned on a pledge to build unity. That’s just a pledge to do nothing.

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jarmartinezs
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Watch Lana Del Rey Cover “I Will Follow You Into The Dark” With Ben Gibbard

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Lana Del Rey's Norman Fucking Rockwell! tour rolled through Denver, CO last night at the Bellco Theatre and Del Rey had a couple special guests on-hand. Death Cab For Cutie's Ben Gibbard played a solo set before Del Rey's show, and then she brought him out during her set so that they could … More »
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Culture? Cancelled! Introducing the Wussy Guillotine

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Anarcho-artist: @blakengland

Anarcho-artist: @blakengland

Good news, WUSSY readers! After years of publishing cultural critiques, putting out print magazines, and throwing the best damn parties this side of the Mason-Dixon line, we’ve finally earned enough money to move on to phase two of the Wussy plan! That’s right: we’ve completed the guillotine we’re going to use to execute our comments section!

It seems like just yesterday that we decided to start a fake publishing entity just so we could create a database of people who disagreed with us politically on Facebook but here we are! It’s such a relief to know that all these years of hard work are finally paying off.

Every drag brunch you’ve ever attended! Every piece of merch you’ve ever bought! All of that cash went straight into the guillotine fund. That’s right! Every dime you’ve ever given to WUSSY has been leading up to this moment: our full ascension to an authoritarian queer regime that silences our critics in an orgiastic cataclysm of cultural Marxism!

And we have no one to thank but you!

That’s right! We’re going full judge, jury, and sexecutioner… but also just regular executioner! Cancelled! Cancelled! You’re all cancelled... to death. The crime? Being too problematic to agree with our groupthink, you capitalist/pig/capitalist pig!

I know what you’re thinking: “I’m just an upper middle-class white realtor who thinks cops are good and gentrification is also good and gay marriage and rainbow crosswalks mean there’s no more discrimination and also trans people need to wait their turn for rights. What have I ever done wrong!?” Well, if reading five years of our poorly-informed Bolshevik critiques of literally everything you’ve ever enjoyed in your brief, shallow life hasn’t clued you in yet, it’s not worth trying to convince you now! We’re not interested in discourse. We’re interested in disgorg...ing the vital fluids from your body when we slice off your heads!

The guillotine is thirsty!

There’s a million guillotinable offenses and we’ve already judged you guilty of all of them! Ever been friends with someone who’s eaten at Chick-Fil-A? That’s a guillotining! Ever rooted for a white person to win Drag Race? That’s a guillotining! Ever tapped your toe to a Katy Perry song? Swish swish, bitch, here comes dat guillotine! 

Aw, I’m sorry, did you think that just because we threw fun parties with famous drag queens that we were just your standard neoliberal gay website? Surely you must, since you’ve been getting your Andrew Christians in a bunch over every single critical thing we post! Newsflash: we’re communists! The scary kind! Boo! Perhaps we should put on our little Rachel Maddow glasses and cry on TV while reporting the news? Maybe then you would take us seriously.

“We shouldn’t even be concerned about this when there are real crimes going on in Uganda!” you protest as you are dragged out to the public square while the crowd pelts you with empty poppers bottles. Not a strong argument to make, considering you’ve never done anything to help a person in Uganda and you only bring it up when you read something you don’t like online. Besides, once you’ve felt the guillotine’s icy sting, you won’t be concerned about Uganda or any of the other countries in Africa you can name, which is probably none of them! 

Now, now. There’s no reason to get mad at us for this. After all, if Ellen can make time in her busy schedule of being a piece of shit to every production assistant she’s ever had to make friends with cuddly war criminal George W. Bush, maybe you can try to see eye-to-eye with us… before your head tumbles into the guillotine basket that is. Heck, even if we only executed 5 dissidents a day for the next 100 years, we still wouldn’t be responsible for as many deaths as George W. Bush… and that’s just counting innocent civilians! So maybe take a page from Ellen’s playbook and try to be a little more open minded! It’s important to be friends with people you don’t agree with!

And in case you’re worried, we’re going to slap a coat of rainbow paint on the guillotine. Heck, we’ll even call it a gay-otine! That should be the base level of pandering you need to be okay with something! If you’re going to go out, go out with pride!

So the next time you get pissy at something online, just remember: that organization is probably run by a shadow coalition of maniacs whose thirst for social justice can only be quenched by your fascist blood! Alright readers, we have a lot of work to do going through every comment ever posted on one of our articles and deciding which list you get put on. But be sure to buy tickets to our Shalloween party... or else! We look forward to reading your well-reasoned comments on Facebook! 



Julian Modugno is a writer and humorist based out of Chicago, IL. He hates everything you love and won't be happy until it's destroyed and you're left with nothing. You can follow him on instagram @historysgreatestmonster and on Twitter at @juliocentric



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rocketo
21 days ago
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jarmartinezs
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Why did a gay bar call the police on a drag queen during Atlanta Pride?

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Screen Shot 2019-10-22 at 9.56.54 AM.png

During Pride weekend, the bouncer at TEN Atlanta, apparently incapable of managing RuPaul’s Drag Race icon Tatianna, referred the belligerent Tatianna to their cop-for-hire, who arrested her.

So far, in queer media, this seems to merely be a tabloid headline. But I am bothered.

You might be wondering, why would I care about TEN Atlanta? It’s a bar I pass on the way to another bar. TEN Atlanta is another failed attempt at bringing back mid-century architectural brutalism, and Tatianna was probably booked into a more aesthetically pleasing venue, with better music and fewer cokeheads.

Certainly, it could be ignored as just another TMZ headline.

But I am bothered.

So I have to ask a question, a question I can’t get out of my head:

WHY THE FUCK DID A QUEER BAR CALL THE POLICE ON A DRAG QUEEN DURING PRIDE?

Perhaps you think I’m asking how this happened. Perhaps you want to quibble about the minor details, like how they didn’t technically phone the police, but rather, a bouncer called over a police officer to handle it. That’s not what I’m asking. I’ll ask it again:

Screen Shot 2019-10-22 at 10.00.24 AM.png

WHY THE FUCK DID A QUEER BAR CALL THE POLICE ON A DRAG QUEEN DURING PRIDE?

Am I instead asking what did Tatianna do to get arrested? Am I asking about the narrative of what led to this? The details? 

No. Because this question:

WHY THE FUCK DID A QUEER BAR CALL THE POLICE ON A DRAG QUEEN DURING PRIDE?

…is not actually a question at all. It’s a rhetorical question. It’s an argument. It’s a statement of outrage. Because, in our lost times of He Who Shall Not Be Named (Trump), and racist comments that cratered a queer bar not that long ago (Burkhart’s), our threshold for what is offensive and outrageous disappeared. Concentration camps are yesterday’s news thanks to today’s news of ethnic cleansing. How does one get upset about anything?

Except somehow, I’m angry. Because: I expect that through this waking nightmare, our queer venues will be the brief moment in which we’re awake, the night of the week and the weekend of the year in which we treat each other with empathy and respect our history, and that we do this through community.

So again, I ask:

WHY THE FUCK DID A QUEER BAR CALL THE POLICE ON A DRAG QUEEN DURING PRIDE?

Now, there are a series of answers to this question which I will state now that I am perfectly willing to accept. Because I am about forgiveness. If the answer is: 

“This was a moment of terrible judgment which we made because the hour was late and people were tired, and we’ll examine our policies to make sure this does not happen again,” then I will be the first to say: Good. Thank you. I appreciate the effort. 

Perhaps they might say:

“In a time of mass gun violence, we hired police to protect the event, but they clearly misinterpreted their role, massively overstepped, and terribly embarrassed us.” This would be acceptable.

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But they’re not giving that response and no one has publicly confronted them with the question. It needs to be asked.

They don’t just owe Tatianna an apology. They owe the community an apology. Throwing a visibly queer person into a jail cell is innately dangerous for that visibly queer person. A drag queen is going to be booked into a sex segregated cell with men in a full drag look. They may have to spend the night. Or several days. They are exposed to a unique risk of harassment and sexual assault. This, and the prospect of this, is terrifying. The idea that a queer bar might do this to one of us for drunken misbehavior is terrifying.

They will spend the rest of their lives with an arrest record. They will be exposed to job discrimination permanently. They will have to describe the event in every background check forever. They may have to pay attorneys fees. They may have to take time off work, or get fired, to show up to court, because a bouncer brought in the police instead of pulling them from the club. So again, I ask:

WHY THE FUCK DID A QUEER BAR CALL THE POLICE ON A DRAG QUEEN DURING PRIDE?

“But Tatianna should have behaved herself.”

“But Tatianna broke the law.”

“I never would have done that.”

I know. 

You wouldn’t have thrown the first brick at Stonewall. You wouldn’t have formed a line of queers and forced the cops into a bar and set the bar on fire (history lesson: this happened). That was a lot of law breaking that I’m very much convinced you would not have participated in, and you wouldn’t have the opportunity to march in a sanitized corporate float in the parade that commemorates that whole multi-day riot-against-police thing.

And I know, Tatianna wasn’t fighting decades of police oppression by trying to get into the back room and yelling about it.

If I were cynical, I’d wonder if cashing in on zillion-dollar wristbands while farming your crowd management out to the police could be seen by some of us oversensitive snowflakes as a betrayal of what Pride is commemorating, which, I thought, is safety of vulnerable queers from the police state. But what do I know?

Enough about that.

I have other questions: 

  • If a bouncer does not bounce, are they still a bouncer? 

  • Is this bouncer subcontracting other bouncing duties, like checking ID’s, to a call center in Wisconsin? 

  • Is there more to bouncing than bouncing? 

  • When I see bouncers at the Drunken Unicorn carry a large belligerent man away, are they not bouncers? 

  • Am I confused about what bouncing is? 

  • When manager Becky at Starbucks calls the police on homeless people using the bathroom, is she not, as I heretofore thought, a barista, but rather a bouncer? 

  • Is manager Becky a bouncer who also makes coffee and that’s why she doesn’t know how to use the espresso machine because making coffee is her second job? 

  • Is bouncing just calling the police when patrons don’t follow your orders?

Surprise! Those aren’t really questions either! Gotcha again!

“What about the bouncer’s safety?”

Good question!

Just kidding, it’s not.

EG9uvU1XYAUulJR.jpeg

What do you think the cops do in this situation? Is it somehow different than what a bouncer does? Do they not also carry away the belligerent person who refuses to leave? Are we wary of putting our LGBT bouncers in danger from the claws of a wayward Tatianna, and it’s best to let the police shoulder the risk?

Transferring crowd management to the police just transfers the safety hazard to a different person, piles a much larger safety hazard on Tatianna, and terrorizes a community into thinking that they (or a drunken friend) could be thrown in jail in a dress and heels and makeup by a queer bar during Pride just for being rowdy. Transferring crowd management to the police transfers our safety into the hands of an entity we already know isn’t capable of preserving our safety. 

In these times, deserved shame feels irrelevant. Toxic, victim-blaming arguments play in a loop until they’re accepted as normal in the American psyche. Arresting a drag queen for being belligerent during Pride doesn’t trigger a wave of shock and articles with condemnations about Stonewall or how irony is dead. 

It is simply a cute article on TMZ.

It is in these times of unreality, when morality feels optional, that we must grip to the confidence of our own reality ever tighter. It is the only way that we stave off the unconscionable new reality that is being imposed upon us.

And in my reality, queer lives have value, queer lives deserve empathy, queer lives deserve grace, and queer bar patrons deserve venues that hire cops to protect queer lives, not endanger them. Also, my reality will probably include a ban from TEN. If that means I won’t be forced by friends to listen to bad Taylor Swift remixes while surrounded by the acoustic and aesthetic nightmare of mirrors and concrete and roid-heads on too much coke to stick it in me after escaping or being arrested, so be it.

ADDENDUM: TEN Atlanta owner James Nelson wrote, “We did not call the police, I had APD on staff the entire weekend and she was very confrontational with the officer and resisted his plea, it was his decision to arrest him not ours. And lastly, be very cautious what you defaming content you write, my attorney is a phone call away.”

The original article states, “Perhaps you want to quibble about the minor details, like how they didn’t technically phone the police, but rather, a bouncer called over a police officer to handle it.” The article also refers to a possible apology that would say, “we hired police to protect the event”, and the article refers to the dangers of “farming your crowd management out to the police”. The piece’s references to having hired cops is why the piece is in part a critique of having police on staff at a queer bar, and the statement about “quibbling details” is an argument that the distinction about whether they’re hired or called *is* a quibbling detail, because a bouncer getting the attention of your hired cop, and phoning the police, both lead to obviously similar results.

There is no better finale to this criticism than the owner’s response of bullying via financial power: “My attorney is a phone call away” to threaten action against a local queer rag using the incredible power of the judicial system proves that irony is in fact dead.



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jarmartinezs
22 days ago
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Seattle City Council District 3: Egan Orion and Kshama Sawant

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L-R, Egan Orion is challenging incumbent Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant to represent District 3. (Photos courtesy campaigns)

Incumbent Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant is facing challenger Egan Orion for the District 3 seat, which includes Capitol Hill, the Central District and Yesler Terrace.

Egan Orion

Seattle’s lower- and middle-income residents and small businesses feel that they are being left behind or pushed out by the city’s growing economy. What three concrete actions will you take to address those concerns?

We should start by addressing the most immediate issue facing Seattle—our homelessness crisis. I will work with regional partners to bond for more permanent supportive housing units and expand the number of low-barrier, 24/7 shelters available throughout the city with access to treatment on demand. We need a comprehensive plan to address homelessness, not just a patchwork of disconnected services and unclear outcomes—we owe this to our unsheltered neighbors and to our community at large.

Additionally, too many of my neighbors are struggling to afford rent and stay in their community. The skyrocketing cost of living is disproportionately displacing marginalized communities that have long called District 3 home — such as the LGBTQ and African American communities. We must address this lack of affordable housing by expanding “light density” options to fill the missing middle of housing—like duplexes, triplexes, and small multi-family buildings with single floor living for ADA accessibility and for seniors to age in place.

Finally, we need to do a better job supporting small businesses, especially women, minority, and LGBTQ owned small businesses by finding ways to ease or defer certain taxes and fees, making more predictable changes to regulations and rules, and improving access to capital and workforce development. I will advocate for our diverse and dynamic small business sector.

What is your stance on the city of Seattle’s “welcoming city” policies on residents’ immigrant statuses? Should any of these policies be changed, and how?

I strongly support Seattle’s status as a welcoming, sanctuary city. We must boldly tell immigrants that they are not only welcome, but wanted members of our community. In the face of a federal administration spewing hate and bigotry, immigrants must know they are safe in Seattle. To this end, the city should continue to provide legal resources for immigrant communities, especially undocumented immigrants. The city should also maintain its “sanctuary” status; under no circumstances should Seattle police officers help deport an undocumented immigrant arrested for a non-violent crime. Going forward, the city should actively seek out the opinion of immigrants themselves to ensure city services align with their needs.

Reports of hate crimes have been on the rise in Seattle. How will you make sure people of all backgrounds feel safe from perpetrators of hate crimes and also feel safe reporting the crimes?

I know the pain that hate crimes inflict not only on the victims, but entire communities. After the Orlando massacre, I organized a vigil for the LGBTQ+ community to mourn the lives stolen by hate-fueled gun violence, and since then I’ve been working with the Office of Economic Development to make progress on this issue so no one in our queer and trans communities ever feels unsafe. Although we can’t necessarily end the hate itself, we should do everything possible to protect our most vulnerable communities.

We must create an environment where marginalized groups, including LGBTQ+, people of color, immigrants, and all at risk of hate crimes—feel comfortable going to the proper authorities whenever a hate crime has occurred. We know that these communities have complicated histories with the police, and challenges that extend to today. We must improve community policing by hiring police officers and community officers who look like and come from the neighborhoods they serve and know the local residents. Let’s create a conscious, purposeful system that addresses the historic imbalance between communities of color and the SPD and ensures safety for all.

Finally, representation matters! As a queer man, I can help educate others in leadership positions about the challenges the LGBTQ community faces and how, collectively, we can create a city that’s safe and welcoming for all.

What letter grade would you give the city on reforming race and ethnicity-based bias in law enforcement and why did you give that grade? What would you do differently, if anything?

I would give the city a “D.” While Seattle and the SPD have made progress on meeting the federally mandated consent decree, we are still partially out of compliance. And, as referenced in the previous question, too many communities still do not feel comfortable with our current policing.

All communities—black and brown communities especially—deserve to be safe. We must reduce crime, hold perpetrators accountable, and protect the residents of our neighborhoods while avoiding the creation of an overwhelming police presence that breeds distrust. Seattle needs a more diverse, representative police force so that law enforcement comes from the communities they represent. Again, let’s focus on community policing, building trust within our community, and eradicating unnecessary use of force by the police.

Outside of just our police, we need to reform our criminal justice system that disproportionately harms people of color and minorities. Seattle needs to continue to use and expand upon the L.E.A.D. program and more frequently implement drug and mental health courts so that people who commit crimes get the help they need. To get help, people need to want help, and many are not yet ready to engage with these methods. I want to continue to improve our rehabilitation efforts, rather than just throwing folks in jail where no real progress will be made.

What is your track record on addressing the needs of immigrants and communities of color in your district?

As Executive Director of PrideFest, I spend much of my time thinking about how to lift up, amplify, and celebrate the voices of marginalized members of our community. The focus of my work has been ensuring LGBTQ+ people of all backgrounds are highlighted and empowered, and I’ve fought to ensure that LGBTQ+ immigrants and queer people of color are included in the conversation, featured prominently, and not erased at PrideFest, or any of the events I’ve worked on.

Additionally, in my work with the small business community, I’ve fought to protect women and minority owned businesses. I’ve worked to make sure that these businesses had a seat at the table, so that even in a changing economy and a growing city, their business could continue to thrive District 3.

On the City Council, I would bring this same approach: listening to and seeking out all members of our community to understand their needs and challenges. I would pay particular attention to vulnerable, underrepresented, and marginalized voices in District 3, and never stop fighting for economic and social justice for all.

Egan Orion’s website: https://www.eganforseattle.org/

Kshama Sawant

Seattle’s lower- and middle-income residents and small businesses feel that they are being left behind or pushed out by the city’s growing economy. What three concrete actions will you take to address those concerns?

The affordable housing crisis is the central issue facing working people in Seattle. We need universal rent control. The crisis can only be addressed through bold public policies to make housing affordable. We need a massive expansion of social housing (quality, permanently-affordable), funded by taxing big business.

I’m proud to have supported the City Council resolution for a Green New Deal that passed last month. I proposed amendments that would have overwhelmingly benefitted working class people. These included making clear that we need public transit to be free for all to use in order to expand ridership, advocate for rent control and expanding publicly funded affordable social housing, so people can afford to live near where they work, shop, and play.

Seattle has one of the most regressive tax systems in the Country. We need to tax big businesses and Seattle’s super-rich – not working and middle class families – to fund transit, housing, social services and the other pressing needs. But as we saw from the shameful Amazon Tax repeal, that we cannot rely on establishment politicians, even well-intentioned ones, who under pressure will capitulate to big business.

What is your stance on the city of Seattle’s “welcoming city” policies on residents’ immigrant statuses? Should any of these policies be changed, and how?

Seattle’s current “sanctuary city” laws at present provide few real protections. Seattle should refuse all cooperation with Trump’s deportation machine. Seattle should end heavy-handed policing tactics that criminalize immigrants and people of color. Anyone suspected of a crime who ends up in King County Jail or in the court system risks being deported by ICE agents. Furthermore, immigrants face discriminatory housing and employment policies, and bear the brunt of Seattle’s affordability crisis. Seattle can’t consider itself a “sanctuary city” if working class immigrants can’t afford to live here.

I have used my office to build movements against Trump’s xenophobia and bigotry. I joined a direct action to block the ICE office in downtown Seattle; my office organized a rally in response to the first DACA recipient in Seattle to be detained under Trump in 2017; we supported the hunger strikes two years ago at the Northwest Detention Center against the inhumane conditions for undocumented immigrants at the prison; and I was proud to help lead a mass nonviolent civil disobedience at SeaTac Airport to demanding the release of those detained by Trump’s racist Muslim Ban.

Reports of hate crimes have been on the rise in Seattle. How will you make sure people of all backgrounds feel safe from perpetrators of hate crimes and also feel safe reporting the crimes?

These acts are a part of the emboldening of right-wing ideas since Trump took office. We need to build social movements to protect against bigoted attacks and to make further gains in our struggle for full equality for all.

Our city needs an independently elected office to investigate workplace sexual, gender, and racial harassment and provide support and justice for those impacted by hate crimes. We need to fully fund anti-bullying and harassment education in all our schools and workplaces. Seattle should reject federal laws and that allow discriminatory practices and policies.

Through our movement and my work around the People’s Budget, we’ve won important gains for the LGBTQ community, including funding for an LGBTQ senior center in the heart of Capitol Hill and an LGBTQ wellness center at NOVA High School.

District 3 — including the historically people-of-color Central District and the historically LGBTQ Capitol Hill — is at the epicenter of gentrification in Seattle. To make our city an accepting place for the LGBTQ community and immigrants we need to fight for rent control and a massive expansion of social housing make Seattle affordable for all.

What letter grade would you give the city on reforming race and ethnicity-based bias in law enforcement and why did you give that grade? What would you do differently, if anything?

Grade: F

The city has failed to make meaningful steps toward police accountability. Even the very limited accountability reforms passed by council were undermined in the last contract which the City signed with the Seattle Police Officer’s Guild. I was the only elected official to vote against that contract. It was later ruled by the Federal Judge Robart to make Seattle out of compliance with the Federal Consent Decree on Excessive Use of Force.

While there have been some improvements, I cannot in good conscience give the reforms any grade other than an ‘F’ regarding race and ethnicity-based bias in law enforcement, when black and brown people continue to be disproportionately killed by Seattle Police Officers. What grade would Charleena Lyles give the reforms were she somehow able to grade them posthumously?

I believe we must create a democratically elected community oversight board with full powers to hold police accountable, including the ability to set department policy and to subpoena officers.

What is your track record on addressing the needs of immigrants and communities of color in your district?

As an elected representative of Seattle’s working people for the last six years, and as a South Asian immigrant woman, I am proud to have worked alongside communities of color, workers and the labor movement, small businesses, and marginalized communities.

Together we’ve won the first $15 minimum wage of any major city in the country (the most effective single policy to reduce Seattle’s racial pay gap); replaced Columbus Day with Indigenous People’s Day; blocked a proposed $160 million police bunker; won tens of million for affordable housing and social services, and passed a series of landmark renters’ rights victories.

Unionization is one of the most effective ways to end the racial pay gap, and I have used my office to support workers in their efforts to form unions and fight for workplace rights.

When I have questions about how issues may affect immigrant communities, I have discussed with the activists and representatives from those communities. We helped SHA tenants organize against the 400% rent increases. We’ve helped the Vietnamese Senior Association fight for and win funding for bus passes and cultural enrichment activities.

Kshama Sawant’s website: https://www.kshamasawant.org

The post Seattle City Council District 3: Egan Orion and Kshama Sawant appeared first on The Seattle Globalist.

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